#MACE16: January 2017 Trade Fair – [Photos]

It was thrilling being part of 1st Trade fair in 2017 which took place at Kingston Business School London. This was a great chance which we displayed and get on the spot answers right away about our prototype product. It was also an opportunity to engage with potential customers.

The Trade Fair also provided us opportunity to give consumers a first-hand experience of products; team members were on hand to showcase our product experiences and more.

 

 

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#MACE16 : The Art of Good Value Proposition Design

A truly god value proposition should paint a picture of your brand for prospects. It’s must describe the benefits customers can expect from your products and services. It literally tells your audience:

  • How your product or service solves/improves problems
  • What benefits customers can expect
  • Why customers should buy from you over your competitors
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Image Source: wileyasiablog.com

It should introduce you to prospective buyers and helps you make a strong first impression. for example, Apple is believed to have a great value proposition, one that is particularly impressive is its statement for the MacBook.

The company emphasises how lightweight its product is (its biggest differentiator), while also speaking how advanced its technology is.

 

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Image Source: http://www.apple.com/uk/macbook/

Finally,  a good design value proposition helps tackle the core challenge of every business — creating compelling products and services customers want to buy.

 

 

 

#MACE16: 5 Key Steps of Design Thinking

What is Design Thinking?

Design thinking means working differently, it also a set of processes for solving problems, discovering opportunities, and generating innovative, human-centered solutions. At its heart, design thinking is about adopting a human-centered perspective and an attitude of continual experimentation.

Five Key Steps of Design Thinking

Step 1 – Empathy

Any social endeavour begins with the human element. It involves identifying the molecules that make up your target audience, getting under their skin and finding out what they value, what they want and how they look at the world.

Step 2 – Define

Every cogent work of design requires something of a mission statement to bring clarity and focus to your work. What exactly are you trying to convey? What and who are you addressing? What are you bringing to the table? Sometimes, a problem statement can be condensed to a word, almost a mantra that acts as a guiding principle and other times it might be too complex to condense into a paragraph even.

Step 3 – Ideate

What separates design thinking from other empirical forms of thinking is the primacy placed on thinking wide, being obtuse if you must, until you arrive at interesting solutions.

The first rule of brainstorming dictates that there are no rules, all ideas are welcome and encouraged.  Ideation gives us better answers to our problems and gives us a better idea of a prototype that can delight it’s users. Thinking creatively, having many voices and solutions helps us conjure up the best product for the user.

Step 4 – Prototype

How does one gauge the reactions of one’s users before the final big reveal? The design thinking process, in all it’s stages poses many nagging questions “Will it work?” or “How will they respond?” or even “Will they even get it at all?”. The best way to allay these fears is to come up with a prototype, a demo or a test model if you will. This can be pretty much anything that he user engages with, which is precisely why the ideation process often gives us interesting ideas for a solid prototype.

Step 5 – Test

Once you have sent out your prototypes, the next natural step is to solicit feedback from you users about their experience interacting with it. The way you choose to do this can even get you closer to your users, making yourself more personable and relatable. As mentioned earlier, it’s all about empathy!

#MACE16 : Rapid Prototyping Experience @ FABLAB London

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George Uka and Team presenting our Sand clock prototype product to a team of experts.

How rapid is rapid prototyping? This question evokes different timelines in peoples’ minds. After attending FABLAB London prototype workshop I came out with a different perspective and a deep understanding of the role this process plays in initial  product development.

In the early phase of any product idea, the primary purpose of rapid prototype is learning – which assumptions make sense, which ones don’t. As Janja Song said during the workshop, “It is fine for a prototype to have issues and be ugly,” she says. “The goal of a prototype is to evaluate an idea”.

With a good product prototype it is easy to see if a product idea is worthwhile investing on. If it is not, it can be discard and move on to the next one.

Below are pictures from the workshop event.

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